K-5 Comprehensive Reading Support Program Title 1 Literacy and Math Program/Reading Recovery Program

Welcome to the Brunswick School Department’s website for programs designed to support students in need of educational aid in literacy, reading or mathematics. Included on this website are links which provide both families and teachers with useful online resources that support student learning.

K-5 COMPREHENSIVE READING SUPPORT PROGRAM
Purpose
: To provide support for our students who are struggling with literacy acquisition.

Student Identification: Literacy assessments are given by classroom teachers in conjunction with reading support personnel in the fall to determine eligibility for Reading Support services. Students who do not meet grade level benchmarks at any point during the year may be considered for support. Support services will begin as soon as assessments have been completed and parents have been notified.

Instruction: Explicit skill-based instruction will be provided to students based on need. Instructional components may include

  • phonemic awareness/alphabetic understandings
  • letter identification/formation exercises
  • letter/sound correspondence activities
  • interactive writing
  • guided and shared reading
  • word work (learning how words work)
  • integration of meaning, structure and visual cues
  • story retelling
  • comprehension strategy development
  • informational and creative writing
  • writing conferencing

Student Grouping: Groupings of students will be determined by student need. Groupings may include:

  • individual tutorials
  • small groups of 2-5 students

Progress Monitoring: Students will be assessed throughout the year in order to inform instruction and document growth. Quarterly reports will be developed in conjunction with the classroom teacher. Reports will conform to the Brunswick School Department’s adopted format.

Professional Development for Reading Support Teachers: Ongoing professional development is a key component to the success of the Reading Support Program. Reading Support Teachers will meet monthly to discuss pertinent issues and topics. Additional opportunities for professional development may include:

  • colleague visitations
  • year-long book study about pertinent topics
  • conference/workshop attendance

Support for Staff: Reading Support Teachers will continue to provide support for classroom teachers and paraprofessionals in a variety of ways based on need. Support may include:

  • collaboration with teachers of identified students
  • teaching how to analyze running records
  • modeling lessons
  • co-planning lessons

Intended Outcomes:

  • continue to provide high quality intervention to struggling students
  • increase literacy achievement of more students over time
  • ensure uniformity and consistency within the Literacy Support Program in all elementary schools
  • increase classroom teacher literacy knowledge
  • begin to address the needs of Response to Intervention

Progress Reports:
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grades 3-5

Forms:
Benchmarks
Referral Form

TITLE I LITERACY AND MATH
Title I is a federally-funded program designed to support students in need of educational help in literacy or mathematics. Our program targets students in lower elementary grades across the district. We emphasize:

  • setting goals for improvement
  • measuring student progress
  • supplementing the regular classroom program
  • involving parents in all aspects of the program
  • promoting Family Literacy Nights or Parent Information Nights

We are fortunate in Brunswick to have highly skilled and well trained Title I teachers who provide high quality instructional strategies and practices for our students.

READING RECOVERY
Here in Brunswick we are pleased and proud to provide the Reading Recovery program at our elementary Schools: Coffin School and the Harriet Beecher Stowe School. Reading Recovery is an effective early literacy intervention designed to help specially selected first grade children who need additional assistance in learning to read.  Reading Recovery provides daily one to one teaching with a specially trained teacher for children making the slowest progress in literacy learning after a year at school. It is supplementary to classroom instruction. Reading Recovery teaches children to use a variety of strategies, with an emphasis on considering meaning. Children are taught to use a balance of reading cues by asking themselves:

Does it Make Sense? Does it Sound Right? Does it Look Right?

The average program lasts for 12-20 weeks. The goal is always to help children to achieve independence in the classroom.

Developed in New Zealand, Reading Recovery is now widely implemented in English speaking countries throughout the world. This is a non-profit program intended to provide an early intervention. No one makes money off the children’s success.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT READING RECOVERY
Who Can Participate?
  Reading Recovery is open to first grade students who are in need of extra help in reading.

Is Reading Recovery a classroom program?  No. Reading Recovery is not an approach that can be generalized to classrooms or small group teaching. It is a specific approach to prevent literacy problems. During the Reading Recovery intervention the teacher works from the individual child’s knowledge and responses in a one-to-one setting. Reading Recovery, in combination with strong classroom instruction, gives children the best chance for success.

How are students selected for Reading Recovery?  Selection for Reading Recovery is based on recommendation by the classroom teacher and performance on the Observation Survey. The Observation Survey is a group of assessments that tells us exactly what the child knows about reading and writing. It includes Letter Identification, Word Test, Concepts about Print, Writing Vocabulary, Hearing and Recording Sounds in Words, and Text Level Reading.

What helps to make the Reading Recovery Program successful?  The Reading Recovery Program places emphasis on reading for meaning.  Students are taught to use multiple strategies for figuring out unknown words.  These skills are applied when reading and writing. Parents are asked to take part by listening to their child read books each evening and supporting other home practice that is assigned (such as putting together a sentence that has been cut up or practicing high frequency words).  In addition, parents are asked to visit the school in order to watch their child read and write during a Reading Recovery lesson. Parents are asked to be sure their child attends school each day so that no Reading Recovery lessons are missed.

What is a typical Reading Recovery Lesson?  A typical 30-minute Reading Recovery lesson consists of the following:

  • WORD REVIEW: Just before the lesson begins, a couple of minutes are spent practicing reading and writing newly learned words.  The objective is to build a large group of words that the child can read and write quickly.
  • REREADING TWO OR MORE FAMILIAR BOOKS (familiar reading): The lesson begins with the child reading books which s/he has read previously. Early in the program books are short, allowing time to read several stories.  Later in the program, the books are longer, leaving time to reread only 1, or 2, or parts of books. Those unfinished books may go home as homework.  The objective is to increase the exposure to print and allow the child the chance to read smoothly, “like talking”.  Reading smoothly makes it easier to predict what makes sense when “stuck” on a new word and to judge whether or not the whole reading is making sense.
  • RUNNING RECORD: The child reads the new book from yesterday while the teacher takes a running record.  The teacher observes carefully, looking for what the child understands and what s/he finds confusing about the whole process. The objective is to decide which items or strategies the child needs to learn next.
  • WORKING WITH LETTERS AND/OR WORDS USING MAGNETIC LETTERS (word work):  Now the child and teacher work with the magnetic letters to recognize letters and explore how words work. The objective is to become fluent with letter knowledge and to learn some ways to figure out new words.
  • WRITING A STORY (including hearing and recording sounds in words): The child writes a new story, usually of 1-2 sentences.  Early on, children learn simply that our talk can be written down and re-read. Soon, the child gets practice hearing and recording letter sounds in words. When s/he can hear most letters of a word it is chosen for spelling practice. The objective is to give the teacher the opportunity to see what the child understands about print and to teach what new things that the child may not have noticed yet.
  • ASSEMBLING A CUT-UP STORY (cut-up sentence): The teacher writes the child’s sentence on a strip of paper. The teacher cuts phrases, individual words, or word chunks for the child to put back together. The  objective is to help the child find ways to search for known words/letters and to learn to check his/her reading independently.
  • READING A NEW BOOK: Finally the child reads a new book.  The book may present  new letters or words. The objective is to teach the child some strategies that enable him/her to read a slightly more difficult text. Early strategies include knowing direction works left-right, matching the spoken word with the written word, and locating known and new words.  Advanced strategies include learning how to check one’s own reading and how to search for help in the context of the story and in the words on the page.
  • WORD REVIEW: Just before the lesson begins, a couple of minutes are spent practicing reading and writing newly learned words.  The objective is to build a large group of words that the child can read and write quickly.
  • REREADING TWO OR MORE FAMILIAR BOOKS (familiar reading): The lesson begins with the child reading books which s/he has read previously. Early in the program books are short, allowing time to read several stories.  Later in the program, the books are longer, leaving time to reread only 1, or 2, or parts of books. Those unfinished books may go home as homework.  The objective is to increase the exposure to print and allow the child the chance to read smoothly, “like talking”.  Reading smoothly makes it easier to predict what makes sense when “stuck” on a new word and to judge whether or not the whole reading is making sense.
  • RUNNING RECORD: The child reads the new book from yesterday while the teacher takes a running record.  The teacher observes carefully, looking for what the child understands and what s/he finds confusing about the whole process. The objective is to decide which items or strategies the child needs to learn next.
  • WORKING WITH LETTERS AND/OR WORDS USING MAGNETIC LETTERS (word work):  Now the child and teacher work with the magnetic letters to recognize letters and explore how words work. The objective is to become fluent with letter knowledge and to learn some ways to figure out new words.
  • WRITING A STORY (including hearing and recording sounds in words): The child writes a new story, usually of 1-2 sentences.  Early on, children learn simply that our talk can be written down and re-read. Soon, the child gets practice hearing and recording letter sounds in words. When s/he can hear most letters of a word it is chosen for spelling practice. The objective is to give the teacher the opportunity to see what the child understands about print and to teach what new things that the child may not have noticed yet.
  • ASSEMBLING A CUT-UP STORY (cut-up sentence): The teacher writes the child’s sentence on a strip of paper. The teacher cuts phrases, individual words, or word chunks for the child to put back together. The  objective is to help the child find ways to search for known words/letters and to learn to check his/her reading independently.
  • READING A NEW BOOK: Finally the child reads a new book.  The book may present  new letters or words. The objective is to teach the child some strategies that enable him/her to read a slightly more difficult text. Early strategies include knowing direction works left-right, matching the spoken word with the written word, and locating known and new words.  Advanced strategies include learning how to check one’s own reading and how to search for help in the context of the story and in the words on the page.

What is the length of a Reading Recovery Program?  Individual students receive a half-hour lesson each school day for 12 to 20 weeks with a specially trained Reading Recovery teacher.  As soon as students reach grade-level literacy expectations and demonstrate that they can continue to learn through their own efforts, their lessons are discontinued, and new students begin individual instruction.

What are some features of Reading Recovery?

  • Early intervention to prevent failure
  • Tutoring in addition to classroom instruction
  • Short-term acceleration, 12 to 20 weeks
  • Teachers focus on each student’s strengths, not deficits;
  • Students learn strategies to help them become independent readers
  • Students are taught how to predict, confirm, and understand what they read
  • Student knowledge and performance guide instruction
  • Daily writing aids in learning to read
  • Students learn to read by composing and writing their own messages
  • Teachers base instruction on detailed analysis of student behavior and knowledge
  • Teachers can select student reading materials from over 2,000 small books of increasing difficulty

PARENTS: Click HERE for Title I information

contact Greg Bartlett for more information


 

.
.

 

 

Comments are closed.